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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
'll be back at 7:00 eastern time, thank you for joining us. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >>. what's in 2007, analysts meredith whitney was the first to predict major losses for citigroup. she said -- our guest tonight on c-span's q&a. >> next, a discussion on the image of muslims in the u.s.. some of the topics are the controversy over the proposed islamic center near ground zero in york city. it is an hour and half. >> we welcome you to our briefing. and we have a distinguished panel year before you to talk about -- we call it a discussion. i want to be clear that this briefing is not about park 51. none of the panelists here are experts on the project or connected directly. this is not about park 51. the congressional muslim the staff association does not necessarily endorse the positions of the panelists here. we want to bring together experts and community leaders to talk about conversations in the wake of this controversy that is taking place all across america. it is a complex conversation that we're having right now. the muslim staff association represents a
, everyone, this tuesday morning. today on "washington journal," we want to get your thoughts on the right u.s. education system, the problems and solutions. president obama yesterday talking about the issue, saying we need to add one month to the school year, citing competitive nest for the united states. also, you have seen it on msnbc, and democratic candidates are talking about the issue as well. so it is your turn this morning to weigh in. what of the problems and solutions? all numbers are on your screen right there. we will get to your calls in just a minute. and remember, you can send us a or an e-mail. let me show you this headline. "new york daily news." let's add a month to the school year. year. the president backs and longer school year. then also the front page of the story, the president saying the d.c. public schools don't add up to private education. that is from the present yesterday as well. then there is a "the washington post" this morning with the headline. democratic candidates blast the gop over education policies, in search of a rallying issue. it looks like candidates
spurred that the national and local level the u.s. will lose. what do you think? the numbers to call -- you can also e-mail us. and we are on twitter. "curb corruption or lose the war" from "the wall street journal." the author of "why vietnam matters. " he draws on his own experience in vietnam. he starts out by saying -- so, what do you think? curb corruption or losing the war? will that be putting the american effort in jeopardy in afghanistan? "the wall street journal" has this piece. the piece says -- our question for you this morning, is there a danger in the u.s. losing the war in afghanistan do to problems of corruption, and bought more perhaps by the cia, trying to do the right thing and aligning itself with informants, but did they take advantage of the system? "the washington post" has an excerpt modified from "obama's wars." uc and in this year, president obama visiting arlington national -- you see in this here, president obama visiting arlington national cemetery. the peace in "the washington post" says -- so, we are seeing a little bit of the behind-the-scenes give- an
, a look at the u.s. foster care system. daniel heimpel joins us. this is "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] host: good morning, and welcome to "washington journal" for wednesday, september 27, 2010. president obama travels to new york for the u.n. general assembly. he will talk health care reform at a back yard reception in virginia s and meet with insurance commissioners and this evening, a democratic fund- raiser. the house returns to washington for a few days of business and the senate continues work. yesterday it did not move for the defense authorization bill and overturning "don't ask, don't tell." a ban on gays openly serving in the military. top story today, a new book by bob woodward about inside the white house. but with the president and his top military advisers and recounts a tough decision on whether to build up true spirit that is our topic this morning. you can give us a call and way and -- we are also on line. and you can find us on twitter. the top story and "the washington
to the middle east. >> direct negotiations among the u.s., israel, and the palestinian authority in pursuit of a final agreement, sediment, and just peace of two states living side by side -- settlement. george mitchell will answer a few questions, but we still have meetings going on. he will have to return upstairs to rejoin the negotiations. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. the parties have just concluded the first round of trilateral talks. the meeting lasted about an hour and a half. it began with a plenary session involving the full u.s., israeli, and palestinian delegations on the eighth floor of the state department, and then broke to a smaller meeting in the secretary of state's personal office involving prime minister netanyahu, president abbas, secretary clinton, and myself. prime minister netanyahu and president abbas then went into a separate meeting for a direct discussion. that meeting is still going on right now. in the trilateral meeting, there was a long and productive discussion on a range of issues. president abbas and prime minister netanyahu expressed their inte
you for being with us. he is in town for the american political science association's annual meeting. in fact, c-span has been covering a lot of their events. tonight, if you have not gotten enough politics, tonight on c- span is the night to watch politics because we are going to kick off -- all day long this is going on. apm, the political report, there look at -- their look at the political races. and we will look of the cook political report and the 2010 elections and their take on it. if i probably should have mentioned this first, at 4:15 p.m. this afternoon, american political science association 2010 elections. and then tonight, political report. then the california senate debate, which just happened last night between senator boxer and carly fiorina. and then the arizona gov. debate. we will follow that, governor burqa against her opponent, attorney general terry goddard. and then at 11:00 p.m. tonight, the nevada gov. debate between brian stanozol and rory reid, the son of majority leader harry reid. that is all politics tonight. "book tv" coming up. the we have a three-da
give his perspective on the challenges facing u.s. cities and later, steve capt. talks about banking rules for the industry. from the nation's capital, this is "washington journal." host: good morning. it is friday, september 24, 2010 and you are watching "washington journal" and you can see it is a foggy morning here at the nation's capital. the senate yesterday, they managed to deliver a small business bill to the president. if they decided to delay the tax debate until after the election and on campaign finance, the republicans managed to turn down a movement that would have addressed the citizens united decision for the supreme court. we will be talking about a lot of issues this morning, including the house gop pledge to america. and there will be a discussion of disclosure laws for mortgages. we will begin with a discussion about the baby boom generation there is an article in the atlantic, can the baby boomers ?edeem their generation .. and our numbers are on the screen. we will get to your calls and questions in just a few minutes. let me show you the cover of the "at
was first elected to the u.s. house of representatives in 1978 and served as speaker of the house from 1995-1999. since leaving congress, he has written more than 20 books and is an analyst on the fox news channel. our conversation with them includes his early years in politics, his relationship with president clinton, his views on obama, his conversion to catholicism, and his potential race for president. this is about 40 minutes. >> what is the state of our country today? >> we have very significant problems. we learn -- we have to learn how to compete with china, how to deal with radical islam, and how to deal with our deficit. those are going to be difficult challenges. >> you have used the word radical in description of this president. why do you use that word? >> 55% of the american people believe he is a socialist. his policies represent such a huge increase in power in washington. a health care bill the country overwhelmingly wants to appeal, a massive intrusion of government into your life in a way that is just amazing. a financial reform bill that radically centralizes power in wa
for afghanistan. whenever you do a strategic plan, used her with a list of planning assumptions. if any of the internet to be wrong -- when every do a strategic plan, you start out with a list of planning assumptions. if any of them turn out to be wrong, then you have a problem. they looked at the afghan presidential election and started rethinking whether or not we had a credible partner that we could work with, by, and threw in afghanistan. if you look at the way we americans look at counterinsurgency, we are a lot from the british and different experiences of the 20th-century. -- the british and french experiences of the 20th-century. the british and northern -- the british in northern ireland, they thought they were in their own turf. by the same token, the french in algeria, the french considered algeria part of metropolitan france. it was non-negotiable. when the conflict began, algeria was a part of france. that was not from the perspective of the fln. that informed the way they thought about the conflict. you kind of assume that your interests will line up with the host governme
to you about well this weekend, i have to go back to mississippi for a family reunion. >> give us a brief idea of what the book is about? >> the book is about the defection of 6 million african-americans from the south to the north, mid-west to the west. from 1915-1970 when the south began truly to change. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this as i went in. i'll read it to you. everyday more migrants are coming no the cities to seek a better life for their children. >> i wrote this book thinking of any country. it's a movie about the last train home where they have 150 million migrant that's live in the city each year. i want to talk to you about what you have written in the front of your book by richard wright. >> who was he and why did you pick him? >> richard wright was one of the greatest novelists of the 20 j century. he was a migrant from mississippi to chicago. he was the son of a share cropper and always wanted to write. i set out in 1927 to get to chicago. he spent almost his entire career. almost everything he wrote had to do with understanding the migrant exper
experience in washington. it was a national outpouring of people. >> just give us a brief synopsis of what the book is about. >> the book is about the migration experiences of three people that have become part of the larger whole, which was the defection of 6 million african americans from the south to the north, to the midwest and west from 1915, world war i until 1970. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this. i want to read it to you. every day, more migrants are coming into the cities to seek a better life for their children. the scale of this massive migration from the poor countryside to the burgeoning cities is unprecedented in human history. the migrants provide a cheap source of labor booming cities and the thriving economy is built on the backs of those citizens. do you have any idea what country that is? >> i am thinking the united states. i wrote this book with the idea that it would refer to almost every immigrant that crossed the atlantic or the pacific ocean in order to come here. >> it is the movie called "the last train home." they had 130 million migrants t
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)